Janice Dickinson Courageously Faces Battle With Breast Cancer

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Former supermodel Janice Dickinson courageously admitted she has been battling with breast cancer, according to Daily Mail Online. The former America’s Next Top Model judge reveals she has been diagnosed on March 12 after doctors discovered a lump on her right breast. Then after running some mammogram and biopsy tests, she was found to be suffering with early stage ductal carcinoma in situ, which is a common type of breast cancer that begins in the milk ducts. Fernando SchmidtBreast Cancer Cure: Like Angelina Jolie, More Women Prefer Double Mastectomy During her exclusive interview with the Daily Mail, Janice emotionally spoke of the current battle she is dealing with.Like us on Facebook “Today I got very scared… I just get very scared and it hit me,” she said. “But I am not gonna let that define me, the fear. I’m going to get through this, I’ll be just fine kiddo.” The world’s first supermodel first went to seek medical consultation after suffering from a minor stomach pain on March 8. Her doctor then decided to conduct a full medical examination, and thus noted the pea-sized lump on her right breast. “I’m always optimistic,” the 61-year-old model said. “Initially when the doctor found the lump it hurt, it became quite painful when you touch it, that’s the point when I knew this is serious, when the doctor touched this little lump in my right breast… and I went bingo. I have cancer.” Janice admitted that she is worried not for her own life but for the people close to her. “At that moment I knew I had to be brave and I had to be strong,” she said. “I had to find the courage I possess as a woman, that we all have as women and then I had to put my chin up and my shoulders back and take it moment by moment.” According to Breastcancer.org, ductal carcinoma in situ is a non-invasive type of breast cancer. Although it is not life-threatening, it could increase the risk of developing invasive breast cancer in the future. Photo: Wikimedia, Fernando Schmidt